Vehicle Tracking System

Tracking System Used To Fight Ticket

mallet

Tracking System Provides Data

Police Issued Ticket Is Battled With GPS Tracking Device

Nobody likes receiving a speeding ticket from police no matter what the surrounding circumstances are, but when a ticket is given when a speeding violation has not occurred, that can be the catalyst to an extremely frustrating situation. David Riesmeyer, a New Brighton resident, understands that frustration more than anyone after he was recently ticketed for a speeding violation in Pennsylvania by a police officer. Riesmeyer was driving his company vehicle at the time of the incident, and the company vehicle was equipped with a fleet management tracking system that was used for documenting driver speed, location, and time on the clock. “I did not believe I was speeding when the officer signaled his lights and pulled me over, but I was extremely angry when I reviewed the company GPS tracking system in my car that validated my initial feeling”, stated Riesmeyer. The tracking system recorded that Riesmeyer was traveling 10 miles per hour less than what the officer had clocked him driving.

A radar gun was not used by the police officer who issued the ticket, rather a device that is similar to a stop-watch that calculates speed-driven between 2 lines on the roadway. Currently, only state police are authorized to use radar gun technology for calculating driver speed in Pennsylvania.

GPS tracker technology is viewed as more reliable and precise than all other forms of calculating speed currently used by traffic officers.

GPS Tracking System Goes To Court

Riesmeyer now intends on bringing his GPS tracking data to a court, fighting the ticket he feels was wrongly given. Vehicle tracking devices that use GPS to capture driving information are viewed by almost every courtroom as credible and reliable, making Riesmeyer’s case a strong one. “I understand that the courts usually side with the police even if they are wrong, but the evidence I have from the tracking system cannot be disputed”, explained Riesmeyer. Considering the vehicle tracking system technology that recorded the speed Riesmeyer was traveling is used by numerous government agencies, Riesmeyer may be sitting in a position of power.

Is the GPS tracking system data Riesmeyer has more reliable than what the officer used to determine speed?

Have you ever been wrongly ticketed by a police officer?

Do women have an easier time talking their way out of speeding tickets than men?

Learn more about where cops place GPS trackers on cars when conducting surveillance.